Image: Pintera Studio/Pixabay

This lesson little Steve Jobs learned from his father made him a legend

The perfectionist in Steve Jobs was, unquestionably, the influence of his adoptive parent, Paul Jobs. This great father had a lasting impact on Steve’s ideology of business

Steve Jobs was an innovation maverick who created a reputable global company that has been known for its disruptive strategies for more than four decades.  Along the way, he turned out to be an inspiration and ever-green mentor for hundreds of thousands of confusing yet innovative minds to define their success stories.

Indeed, Steve was an energetic and imaginative entrepreneur throughout his life. The stories are overexposed. His tech innovations changed the course of many industries—-telephone, computer, and music. How did he make it happen after coming back from the ashes? 

The quality of perfection that Steve Jobs had been known for was the impact of Paul

Please don’t push off; I am not retelling his business saga that the world has been acquainted with. Rather, I would like to remind all of us just a simple yet powerful episode in the Steve saga. And it’s about the parenting he got during his childhood period. To be very candid, that was instrumental in shaping the success story called Steve Jobs.

Steve’s biological parents had nothing much to boast over it except getting a promise from the adoptive parents. Giving up their child for ambitious careers was a path-breaking decision from graduate students John and Joanne Scheible on February 24, 1955.

For the innovation legend, Paul and Clara were his real parents more than 1,000 per cent

Initially they had only one demand, a gentle one. Those who would adopt their kid need to be graduates. But it didn’t work out well.  The couple who came forward to take Steve were not at all graduates. They belonged to the category of so-called low profiles.

Paul Reinhold Jobs and Clara Hagopian were Steve’s adoptive parents.

Yet, Steve’s biological parents went for the option, situational pressure worked out, after a lot of complexities. The educational status of adoptive couples disturbed Steve’s biological mother; later time proved all her fear went wrong.

Paul Reinhold Jobs and Clara Hagopian were Steve’s adoptive parents. Steve, throughout his life, never liked to call them adoptive parents. For the innovation legend, Paul and Clara were his real parents more than 1,000 per cent.

Walter Isaacson, the author of Steve Jobs, described Paul as a great mechanic who taught his son how to make great things

Paul spent a lot of time with Steve in his childhood period. That had profound impact in shaping the Apple founder’s philosophy of business. The engineer in Steve was a result of that parental intimacy.

Paul was basically a machinist, even though he practiced many jobs. Walter Isaacson, the author of Steve Jobs, described Paul as a great mechanic who taught his son how to make great things.

“I was very lucky…My father was a pretty remarkable man, was kind of a genius with his hands. He showed me how to use a hammer and saw and how to build things. It really was very good for me. He spent a lot of time with me,” Steve Jobs once said, as quoted in the biography, Steve Jobs: Thinking differently, by Patricia Lakin.

There was a workbench for Paul in his garage; a lot of tools were there. His father took down a part of it for the six years old kid, and said, “Steve, this is your workbench now.” Lakin explained very well about the influence of Paul in the character of Steve in his book.

Image: Pixabay

Allowing a young child to invade the workspace of parents was something strange for many. Steve always believed that his father can fix anything and make it work. Paul was enthusiastic about electronics and felt pride in workmanship. He passed that feeling to Steve in the most constructive way, shaping the creativity of the man who produced the iPod, the iPhone, and the iPad.

Patricia Lakin mentioned in his book that Steve started to gravitate more toward electronics because of his father. Paul used to get Steve things he could take apart and put back together. Compare this with an average parent when his kid used to do that kind of stuff, even today.

The quality of perfection that Steve Jobs had been known for was the impact of Paul. Just look at the famous fence story, you may have gone through it.

Once, Paul took little Steve with him to build a fence around their home. While building the fence, the father gave him an advice that he was taken to make the back of the fence, that nobody will see, but it needed to be just as looking as the front.

“Whatever you do, do it perfect, do it with most precision and care, and do it with 1,000 per cent commitment, no matter how many people will see it.”

Steve got the message correctly. “Even though nobody will notice the work you do, you are committed to making it perfect.”

Later, at Apple and NeXT, Steve made use of his father’s valuable advice, and spread the culture among his team of engineers also.

“Whatever you do, do it perfect, do it with most precision and care, and do it with 1,000 per cent commitment, no matter how many people will see it.”

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